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7 Comments

  1. Suze

    I am curious about which oils would be efficacious for several medical conditions. Specifically heart disease, elevated blood pressure, elevated cholesterol, pre-diabetes and arthritis. I have used argon oil on my hair and skin for about ten years, and have used lavender for a sleep aid. Can you tell me specific EOs for the above medical issues?

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    1. Roxy

      Suze, first of all I love Argon oil too! Lavender is amazing. I call it the “swiss army knife” of essential oils. Your question on EO’s and health conditions has a lot of answers. EO’s have a lot of overlap based on their chemical constituents. I will address each ailment below. I don’t know how much you know about EO’s but I’d like you to read the following about the make-up of EO’s to start with. https://theoilyguru.org/2016/07/17/key-chemical-compounds-in-essential-oils-and-their-effects/

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    2. Roxy

      HEART:
      Treatment may vary.

      Essential oils that may be used for clogged, hardened arteries include:
Rosemary (Rosmatinus officinalis) and 
Juniper (Juniperus communis).
      Essential oils that aid circulation include: basil, geranium, lavender, neroli, pine, thyme, and vetiver.

      Essential oils that may be used for heart palpitations or heart failure include:
      Camphor (Cinnamomum camphora). 
Lavender (Lavandula officinalis). 
Melissa (Melissa officinalis). 
Neroli (Citrus aurantium). 
Peppermint (Mentha piperata). 
Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis). 
Ylang-ylang (Cananga odorata).

      Essential oils that may be used for clogged, hardened arteries include:
Rosemary (Rosmatinus officinalis) and 
Juniper (Juniperus communis).

      Essential oils that aid circulation include: basil, geranium, lavender, neroli, pine, thyme, and vetiver.

      Essential oils that may be used for heart palpitations or heart failure include:
      Camphor (Cinnamomum camphora). 
Lavender (Lavandula officinalis). 
Melissa (Melissa officinalis). 
Neroli (Citrus aurantium). 
Peppermint (Mentha piperata). 
Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis). 
Ylang-ylang (Cananga odorata).

      You may:
      Inhale the vapors from these oils as they rise from a bowl of water
Mix essential oils in a base oil and use in massage
Wear them as a perfume
Mix essential oils with the bath water.

      There are many natural essential oils that can help heal inflammation and symptoms related to heart disease. Some include lemon oil, lemongrass oil, frankincense oil, helichrysum oil and ginger oil. The active ingredients found in plants are their most potent in this concentrated form. Ginger essential oil, for example, contains the highest levels of anti-inflammatory gingerol, and helichrysum oil kicks off inflammatory enzyme inhibition, free-radical scavenging activity and corticoid-like effects.

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    3. Roxy

      BLOOD PRESSURE:
      Lavender (Lavandula Angustifolia)
      Lavender is high in alcohols and esters. It is a calming and gentle essential oil that works as a tonic on your nervous system and balances it. Considered as the grandmother of all the essential oils, lavender oil has a supportive ad soothing effect on your body as well as emotions. It is an effective antidote for treating depression, unbalanced emotions and nervous disorders. It helps in releasing a positive mental energy that helps in soothing stressed behaviors and high blood pressure. Lavender oil has an herbaceous, floral and sweet aroma.

      Sweet Marjoram (Origanum Marjorana)
      This oil has balancing and comforting properties similar to that of lavender. It is high in alcohols and is a tonic that warms, uplifts and balances your body. It calms your mind and is used for treating nervous exhaustion and lethargy. It also helps in calming obsessive thinking, eases emotional cravings and promotes self-nurturing in your body. It has a spicy, woody and warm fragrance, which is herbaceous and fresh as well.

      Ylang Ylang (Cananga Odorata)
      This oil is rich in sesquiterpenes that have a hypotensive and calming nature. It is also found in esters and alcohols, which is why its properties resemble those of lavender. It is supportive and calming and effectively clears nervous tension in your body that often causes high blood pressure. Ylang ylang calms agitation and restlessness and promotes sleep. It also soothes frustration and anger while uplifting and relaxing your body. It has a very sweet and intense floral aroma.

      Other Oils That May Help
      Besides these essential oils for high blood pressure, you can use several other essential oils that have an antidepressant, sedative, calming and relaxing effect on your body.
      These include:
      * Roman chamomile: It relieves nervous stress, eases frustration and depression.
      * Bergamot: It helps in releasing accumulated stress in your body as well as repressed emotions by releasing those feelings. It also promotes optimism and spontaneity.
      * Frankincense: It stops mental chatter, agitation and calms your mind. It encourages insight, spiritual self-discipline and tranquility in your body as well.
      * Neroli: It offers strength and comfort while releasing repressed emotions from your body. Moreover, it encourages joy and hope.
      Note: People who have elevated blood pressure must avoid using sage, rosemary, thyme and hyssop essential oils.

      Inhalation and massage are effective and efficient means of using essential oils for treating high blood pressure.

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    4. Roxy

      ARTHRITIS:

      Ginger has anti-inflammatory, anti-ulcer and antioxidant activities, as well as a small amount of analgesic properties, making it a great option for arthritis sufferers.
      The Arthritis Foundation reports a study from the University of Miami that concluded that ginger extract could be a substitute to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). The study compared the effects of a highly concentrated ginger extract to placebo in 247 patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. The ginger reduced pain and stiffness in knee joints by 40 percent over the placebo.
      Researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles showed that ginger affects certain inflammatory processes at a cellular level. Ginger has anti-inflammatory, anti-ulcer and antioxidant activities, as well as a small amount of analgesic properties, making it a great option for arthritis sufferers. 

      Turmeric
      The most active ingredient in turmeric, curcumin, has become known as a great anti-inflammatory. Turmeric benefits include being highly effective at helping people manage rheumatoid arthritis.
      A recent study out of Japan evaluated its relationship with interleukin (IL)-6, the inflammatory cytokine known to be involved in the RA process, and discovered that curcumin significantly reduced inflammation. This evidence suggests that regular turmeric use could be a powerful way to combat the development of RA!

      Frankincense oil can inhibit the production of key inflammatory molecules associated with conditions like arthritis and can be useful in helping to prevent the breakdown of the cartilage tissue. This has been shown to significantly reduce levels of inflammation, making it a natural treatment option for pain-related conditions that affect the muscles, joints and tendons.

      Myrrh oil also had anti-inflammatory properties, and it’s often used in tandem to treat arthritis. A study published in Scientific Reports showed that frankincense and myrrh are highly effective in treatment of inflammatory diseases, especially when combined.
      The study revealed that frankincense and myrrh, especially when used together, suppress inflammation and the intensity of joint inflammation. Results showed that the individual extract of frankincense or myrrh and combined extracts used to treat groups showed significant differences when compared with the arthritis control group.

      Orange Oil: Citrus scents make you feel more awake, and the strong anti-inflammatory properties of orange oil have been researched in regard to their effects for fighting pain. A 2009 study published in the European Journal of Medical Research investigated the antioxidant potential of various essential oils, reporting that orange was the most highly effective of those studied, which in turn makes it a great essential oil for arthritis treatment.
      Try diluting a few drops of the orange essential oil with 1 teaspoon of avocado or almond oil, and then rub it onto the back of your hand or wherever you have arthritic pain.

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    5. Roxy

      I am not a Doctor and in no way should this be construed as medical advice. If you want more information on alternative therapies please feel free to contact me again. This is a good starting point.

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  2. Roxy

    Oops! Diabetes (all)
    Aromatherapy and Essential Oils for Diabetes

    Calming Essential Oils May Help Reduce the Stress that Can
    Raise Blood Glucose Levels

    A number of Web sites, books and diabetics report that blood glucose levels can increase in diabetics when their stress level rises.
    Clary Sage
    Source:
    Shirley Price, The Aromatherapy Workbook (London: Thorsons, 1993), 270.

    Eucalyptus
    Sources:
    Jean Valnet, MD, The Practice of Aromatherapy (Rochester, VT: Healing Arts Press, 1990), 202.
    Robert Tisserand, The Art of Aromatherapy (Rochester, VT: Healing Arts Press, 1977), 218, 299.
    Shirley Price, The Aromatherapy Workbook (London: Thorsons, 1993), 270.

    Geranium
    Sources:
    Internal use specified: Jean Valnet, MD, The Practice of Aromatherapy (Rochester, VT: Healing Arts Press, 1990), 133.
    Robert Tisserand, The Art of Aromatherapy (Rochester, VT: Healing Arts Press, 1977), 231, 299.
    Shirley Price, The Aromatherapy Workbook (London: Thorsons, 1993), 270.

    Juniper Berry
    Sources:
    Valnet’s comment may actually be about ingestion of the berry, not use of the essential oil. Jean Valnet, MD, The Practice of Aromatherapy (Rochester, VT: Healing Arts Press, 1990), 87.
    Robert Tisserand, The Art of Aromatherapy (Rochester, VT: Healing Arts Press, 1977), 240, 299.
    Shirley Price, The Aromatherapy Workbook (London: Thorsons, 1993), 270.

    Lemon
    Source:
    Shirley Price, The Aromatherapy Workbook (London: Thorsons, 1993), 270.

    Pine
    Source:
    Shirley Price, The Aromatherapy Workbook (London: Thorsons, 1993), 270.

    Thyme (Red and Sweet)
    Source:
    Shirley Price, The Aromatherapy Workbook (London: Thorsons, 1993), 270.

    Vetiver
    Source:
    Shirley Price, The Aromatherapy Workbook (London: Thorsons, 1993), 270.

    Ylang Ylang
    Source:
    Shirley Price, The Aromatherapy Workbook (London: Thorsons, 1993), 270.

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